In This Article The Durability of International Conflict Settlements

  • Introduction
  • General Overviews
  • Settlements and Peace Treaties

International Relations The Durability of International Conflict Settlements
by
Stephen L. Quackenbush
  • LAST MODIFIED: 30 June 2014
  • DOI: 10.1093/obo/9780199743292-0081

Introduction

War and other forms of international conflict must end at some point. Sometimes, the post-conflict peace is very stable, but other times conflict is renewed in short order. Many studies have endeavored to explain what makes peace more (or less) likely to last. This review begins by examining general overviews of the durability of international conflict settlements. It then turns to an exploration of different approaches to the subject, beginning with Recurrent Conflict Approaches, including explanations focused on settlement type, outcome, and the bargaining model of war. Discussion of Conflict Management Approaches follows, including studies analyzing mediation and peacekeeping. The review then looks at Rivalry Approaches, which seek to explain the origins, evolution, and termination of international rivalry. The literature regarding the Stability of Civil War Settlements is also examined, grouped in a similar way as the literature focused on interstate conflict. The review ends with an examination of studies of Settlements and Peace Treaties themselves.

General Overviews

Several studies provide general overviews of the durability of international conflict settlements. Thomson, et al. 1945 is one of the earliest analyses of how to create lasting peace following war. Druckman and Diehl 2006 is a five-volume edited overview of theory, research, and practice related to conflict resolution. Murray and Lacey 2009 is an edited volume offering a broad historical perspective on the making of peace following war. Miall 1992 examines the role of conflict management techniques and issues in settling disputes. Hartzell and Yuen 2012 reviews the literature on the subject. Holsti 1991, a general survey of international conflict since Westphalia, examines questions of how to make lasting peace following war, including a list of prerequisites for peace. Hughes and Seligmann 2002 provides a historical examination of why peace so often failed in the 20th century. Although they do not specifically focus on the stability of international conflict settlements, Ikle 2005 and Kecskemeti 1958 are highly relevant to the subject.

  • Druckman, Daniel, and Paul F. Diehl. Conflict Resolution. 5 vols. London: SAGE, 2006.

    E-mail Citation »

    Five-volume edited overview of theory, research, and practice related to conflict resolution. Chapters examine a variety of topics within these three basic areas.

  • Hartzell, Caroline, and Amy Yuen. “The Durability of Peace.” In Guide to the Scientific Study of International Processes. Edited by Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, Paul F. Diehl, and James D. Morrow, 233–250. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

    E-mail Citation »

    A chapter in the International Studies Association Compendium that reviews the literature on the stability of peace following interstate and intrastate conflict.

  • Holsti, Kalevi. Peace and War. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

    DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511628290E-mail Citation »

    A general survey of international conflict since Westphalia. Examines questions of how to make lasting peace following war, including a list of prerequisites for peace.

  • Hughes, Matthew, and Matthew S. Seligmann. Does Peace Lead to War? Peace Settlements and Conflict in the Modern Age. Stroud, UK: Sutton, 2002.

    E-mail Citation »

    Historical examination of why peace so often failed in the 20th century.

  • Ikle, Fred Charles. Every War Must End. 2d rev. ed. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005.

    E-mail Citation »

    Historical work focused on war termination. Considers the stability of war termination agreements.

  • Kecskemeti, Paul. Strategic Surrender: The Politics of Victory and Defeat. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1958.

    E-mail Citation »

    Examines the dynamics of surrender, focusing on case studies of World War II.

  • Miall, Hugh. The Peacemakers: Peaceful Settlements of Disputes since 1945. New York: St. Martin’s, 1992.

    E-mail Citation »

    Examines the role of conflict management techniques and issues in settling disputes. Compiles useful summaries of settlements during the Cold War.

  • Murray, Williamson, and Jim Lacey, ed. The Making of Peace: Rulers, States, and the Aftermath of War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

    E-mail Citation »

    An edited volume offering a broad historical perspective on the making of peace following war. Most chapters focus on specific wars in history, while others examine thematic elements.

  • Thomson, David, E. Meyer, and A. Briggs. Patterns of Peacemaking. London: Routledge, Trench, and Trubner, 1945.

    E-mail Citation »

    An early analysis of how to create lasting peace following war. Focused on World War II.

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