Music Orlande de Lassus
by
Bernhold Schmid
  • LAST MODIFIED: 28 May 2013
  • DOI: 10.1093/obo/9780199757824-0060

Introduction

Orlande de Lassus (b. 1532–d. 1594) is also known in modern writing as Orlando di Lasso and Roland de Lassus. He must be counted, together with Palestrina, among the most important composers of the second half of the 16th century. No composer was more often published than Lassus (more than 475 prints containing his work exists, with some pieces being printed more than twenty times, and some of these appear with more than two or three different texts). Moreover, more than six hundred manuscripts from the 16th and 17th century are found to contain works from Lassus, most of which, however, were copied from prints. This long history of transmission and reception reveals a significant influence on the music of his own time, and on that of the early 17th century. Numerous theorists cite his works when discussing contrapuntal theory or to present theory of modes. Contemporary scholars even refer to a German Lasso-school (and thus Heinrich Schütz, who studied with Lassus’ student Giovanni Gabrieli, is considered a “grandson” of Lassus). Finally, the reception of Lassus was not confined by confessional boundaries, for his works were treasured and handed down on both sides of the confessional divide, and many of his works specifically for Catholic practice (e.g., the Salve Regina) were given other texts for Protestant usage. While Lassus cultivated all compositional genres of his day, his greatest achievement should probably be considered the sphere of the motet. Nevertheless, since he tended to ignore rigid distinctions between genres, he can be said to belong to that group of composers who were pioneers in the internationalization of musical style toward the end of the 16th century. Even among his contemporaries he was recognized for his great artistic ability in the expression of texts. For this article I have used RILM-abstracts and Erb 1990, cited under Guides to Repertory and Literature. Many thanks to Professor Calvin M. Bower for his contribution to this entry.

General Overviews

Only a few works other than encyclopedia articles (see Reference Works) attempt to treat all topics concerning Lassus’ life, his works (including style and chronology), and his sources. The best present-day overview is Coeurdevey 2003. Boetticher 1999 is an extensive monograph, but it doesn’t always give reliable information. Short and compact information is given in Bossuyt 1982. Van den Borren 1920 is still important for its musical descriptions.

  • Boetticher, Wolfgang. Orlando di Lasso und seine Zeit 1532–1594: Repertoire-Untersuchungen zur Musik der Spätrenaissance. Vol. 1, Monographie. Wilhelmshaven, Germany: Verlag der Heinrichshofen-Bücher, 1999.

    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

    This monograph (first published in 1958) tries to give a comprehensive overview on Lassus’ life, his works, the development of his style, and the sources. This book contains many mistakes, which have been commented and corrected by Leuchtmann 1976 (cited under Biography).

    Find this resource:

    • Bossuyt, Ignace. “Orlandus Lassus (1532–1594): Leven en werk.” In Orlandus Lassus 1532–1594. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, 29–59. Leuven, Belgium: Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, K. U. Leuven, 1982.

      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

      An overview organized in short paragraphs, thereby making it easy to use.

      Find this resource:

      • Coeurdevey, Annie. Roland de Lassus. Paris: Fayard, 2003.

        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

        Smaller in size than Boetticher 1999, this book is much more reliable. It is divided in two parts (Part 1: “Biography and History of the Origin of his Works”; Part 2: “Style”). Indexes give an overview of the main printed and the manuscript sources and their contents.

        Find this resource:

        • van den Borren, Charles. Orlande de Lassus. Paris: Librairie Felix Alcan, 1920.

          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

          Provides much less biographic information than is now available. The book is also based on a limited number of his works. Still, it remains interesting for its description of works.

          Find this resource:

          Reference Works

          Two encyclopedia articles, Bossuyt and Schmid 2003 and Haar 2007–2012, give a short overview on Lassus’ life, works, and style. Both also contain comprehensive bibliographies, and the main sources and works are listed.

          Guides to Repertory and Literature

          The aim of the following books is to give a comprehensive overview of Lassus’ works, the sources, and the literature. Leuchtmann and Schmid 2001 describes the original prints, and it can also be used as a comprehensive list of works. Leuchtmann 1975 is a short list of printed sources. Boetticher 1998 is problematic but important for its list of manuscripts. Erb 1990 is a bibliography covering up until 1989.

          • Boetticher, Wolfgang. Orlando di Lasso und seine Zeit 1532–1594: Repertoire-Untersuchungen zur Musik der Spätrenaissance. Vol. 2, Verzeichnis der Werke, Mit einer Übersicht der nachgewiesenen handschriftlichen und gedruckten Quellen. Wilhelmshaven, Germany: Heinrichshofen, 1998.

            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

            Organized as a list of text-incipits, the entries give printed and manuscript sources, literature, and editions. Although the book is not reliable in every respect, it is necessary because it contains many manuscript sources and some historically interesting editions.

            Find this resource:

            • Erb, James. Orlando di Lasso: A Guide to Research. New York and London: Garland, 1990.

              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

              An extensive, annotated bibliography covering up until 1989. The book is organized in four chapters: “Biographical Sketch,” “Works of Orlando di Lasso,” “Bibliography,” and “A Selected Lasso Discography.” The book concludes with an Index (Authors, Editors, Title Incipits). Together with RILM-abstracts, the best guide to literature (both were used for preparing this bibliography).

              Find this resource:

              • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Lasso (Lassus) Orlando di (de).” In Repertoire international des sources musicales A/I, Einzeldrucke vor 1800. Vol. 5. Edited by Karlheinz Schlager, 232254. Kassel, Germany: Bärenreiter, 1975.

                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                Lists the prints containing only works by Lassus (Einzeldrucke) and the libraries in which they are found. See also volume 12, Addenda et Corrigenda: G–L, pp. 383–385.

                Find this resource:

                • Leuchtmann, Horst, and Bernhold Schmid. Orlando di Lasso: Seine Werke in zeitgenössischen Drucken 1555–1687. 3 vols. Kassel, Germany: Bärenreiter, 2001.

                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                  Lists in all about 475 still existing prints containing works of Lassus. Gives description and contents of the prints, literature to the prints, and literature to individual compositions. The first volume begins with introducing articles. The works are numbered as Lasso-Verzeichnis‑LV. Volume 3 contains a bibliography and indexes; there one finds a list with works not printed: Lasso-Verzeichnis Anhang‑LVanh.

                  Find this resource:

                  Biography

                  Beginning with Quickelberg 1566, considerable literature exists concerning Lassus’ life. Many details in older articles and books are contradictory. The standard today is Leuchtmann 1976. Bossuyt 1993, Freedman 2006, Leuchtmann 1977, O’Regan 1999 and Persoons 1982 are mainly significant articles, with some new information subsequent to Leuchtmann 1976. Sandberger 1894 provides a good deal of important archival material.

                  • Bossuyt, Ignace. “Lassos erste Jahre in München (1556–1559): Eine cosa non riuscita?” In Festschrift für Horst Leuchtmann zum 65: Geburtstag. Edited by Stephan Hörner and Bernhold Schmid, 55–67. Tutzing, Germany: Hans Schneider, 1993.

                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                    Gives definite evidence that Lassus came to Munich in autumn 1556.

                    Find this resource:

                    • Freedman, Richard. “From Munich to Paris. Orlando di Lasso, Adrian Le Roy, and Listeners at the Royal Court of France.” In Die Münchner Hofkapelle des 16: Jahrhunderts im europäischen Kontext, Bericht über das internationale Symposion der Musikhistorischen Kommission der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Verbindung mit der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte, München, 2–4 August 2004. Edited by Theodor Göllner and Bernhold Schmid, 143–159. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission beim Verlag C. H. Beck, 2006.

                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                      Discusses the connections between Lassus, the Paris court, and the lutenist and printer Le Roy, all of which were more closely related than previously assumed.

                      Find this resource:

                      • Leuchtmann, Horst. Orlando di Lasso: Sein Leben; Versuch einer Bestandsaufnahme der biographischen Einzelheiten. Wiesbaden, West Germany: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1976.

                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                        This is the most important biography. Organized as a chronology with extensive annotations and discussion, many mistakes in older literature are corrected. A survey of older literature in “Einleitung” (pp. 12–44) is also very useful. Contains a large bibliography, discusses the iconography (with illustrations), and publishes poems concerning Lassus. After Leuchtmann’s book, only a few additions and corrections have been published (see for example, Bossuyt 1993).

                        Find this resource:

                        • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Orlando di Lasso als Ritter des Goldenen Sporns.” Musik in Bayern 14 (1977): 94–95.

                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                          On 6 April 1574 Lassus became Ritter des Goldenen Sporns. The article gives evidence.

                          Find this resource:

                          • O’Regan, Noel. “Orlando di Lasso and Rome: Personal Contacts and Musical Influences.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 132–157. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                            DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                            A survey of Lassus’ personal contacts in Rome between 1552 and 1554, when he lived there, and in 1574, when he visited Rome again. An inventory of his (and also Palestrina’s) contacts to the Archconfraternity of SS Crocefisso is included. Discusses musical cross-influences between Lassus and Roman colleagues. Musical examples.

                            Find this resource:

                            • Persoons, Guido. “Orlandus Lassus in Antwerpen (1554–1556).” In Orlandus Lassus 1532–1594. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, 71–80. Leuven, Belgium: Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, K. U. Leuven, 1982.

                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                              Gives information on Lassus’ first musical prints, on his name, on his connections to important persons (Stefano Gentile, Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle) and on musicians coming from Antwerp to Lassus’ Hofkapelle in Munich.

                              Find this resource:

                              • Quickelberg, Samuel. “Orlandus de Lassus Musicus.” In Prosopographiae heroum atque illustrium virorum totius Germaniae, pars tertia. Edited by Heinrich Pantaleon, 541–542. Basel, Switzerland: Nicholas Brylinger, 1566.

                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                The first article on Lassus’ life; Quickelberg wrote it when Lassus was thirty-four or thirty-six years old. Quickelberg was working in the court Duke Albrecht V and knew Lassus very well. Contains a portrait. Facsimile in Leuchtmann 1976 (cited under Biography), pp. 298–301.

                                Find this resource:

                                • Sandberger, Adolf. Beiträge zur Geschichte der bayerischen Hofkapelle unter Orlando di Lasso. Vol. 1, In drei Büchern. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1894.

                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                  This is not really a biography: volume 1 describes Lassus’ life until 1556 (when he came to Munich). Volume 3. Dokumente, contains a necessary basis for the composer’s biography and the Munich Hofkapelle during his life, for it makes accessible a significant number of archival sources. (Volume 2 was never published.) Unfortunately there is no index.

                                  Find this resource:

                                  Source Studies

                                  Lassus’ works were disseminated widely in the second half of the 16th century, and well into the 17th. About 475 prints and more than 600 manuscripts still exist. No musical autographs have been preserved (see Gancarczyk 2006 and Hell 1984). Bergquist 2008, Cardamone and Jackson 1989, and Forney 1985–1986 are detailed studies on the process of printing and connections between different edition of the same title. Manuscripts are discussed in Elders 1967, Persoons 1982, Urch 1994 and Vanhulst 1996. See also Boetticher 1998 and Leuchtmann and Schmid 2001, cited under Guides to Repertory and Literature, and the citations under Facsimiles.

                                  • Bergquist, Peter. “The Two Editions of Lasso’s Selectissimae Cantiones, 1568 and 1579.” In Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 6. Edited by Bruno Bouckaert and Eugeen Schreurs, 147–157. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 2008.

                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                    Leonhard Lechner revised the second edition of Lasso’s Selectissimae Cantiones (1579) and corrected some mistakes.

                                    Find this resource:

                                    • Cardamone, Donna G., and David L Jackson. “Multiple Formes and Vertical Setting in Susato’s First Edition of Lassus’s ‘Opus 1.’” Notes 46.1 (1989): 7–24.

                                      DOI: 10.2307/940745Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                      Describes in particular the labor costs–saving printing process. See also Forney 1985–1986.

                                      Find this resource:

                                      • Elders, Willem. “The Lerma Codex: A Newly Discovered Choirbook from Seventeenth-Century Spain.” Tijdschrift van de Vereniging voor Nederlandse Muziek Geschiedenis 20.4 (1967): 187–205.

                                        DOI: 10.2307/938958Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                        A large collection copied between 1600 and 1620 containing chansons, madrigals, and motets. Forty-three pieces from Lassus.

                                        Find this resource:

                                        • Forney, Kristine K. “Orlando di Lasso’s ‘Opus 1’: The Making and Marketing of a Renaissance Music Book.” Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenschap 39–40 (1985–1986): 33–60.

                                          DOI: 10.2307/3686970Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                          Detailed study treating the different editions of Lassus’ Opus 1, published in Antwerp (Susato) in 1555, both with French and Italian title, around 1558 (but mistakenly dated 1555) with French title (Susato), and 1560 with French title (Susato). An examination of the music type-fonts offers evidence concerning a Susato edition c. 1558. Physical description, bibliographic history, facsimiles. See also Cardamone and Jackson 1989.

                                          Find this resource:

                                          • Gancarczyk, Paweł. “Origin, Repertory, and Context of ‘Lasso’s Autograph’ from Gdańsk.” In Die Münchner Hofkapelle des 16. Jahrhunderts im europäischen Kontext: Bericht über das internationale Symposion der Musikhistorischen Kommission der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Verbindung mit der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte, München, 2–4 August 2004. Edited by Theodor Göllner and Bernhold Schmid, 297–309. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission beim Verlag C. H. Beck, 2006.

                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                            Gives evidence that the manuscript 4030 from the Gdańsk Library of the Polish Academy of Sciences, formerly assumed to be a Lassus autograph, was not written by the composer.

                                            Find this resource:

                                            • Hell, Helmut. “Ist der Wiener Sibyllen-Codex wirklich ein Lasso-Autograph?” Musik in Bayern 28 (1984): 51–64.

                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                              The manuscript Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Mus. Hs. 18.744, four partbooks containing Lassus’ first composition of the Sacrae lectiones ex propheta Iob and the Prophetiae Sibyllarum had long been assumed to be written by the composer. The copyist was actually Jean Pollet.

                                              Find this resource:

                                              • Persoons, Guido. “Het Johannes Naich-Lassus handschrift uit 1575 met Phalesius-Bellerus-convoluut van negen Lassus-muziekdrukken uit 1570–1574.” In Orlandus Lassus 1532–1594. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, 67–70. Leuven, Belgium: Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, K. U. Leuven, 1982.

                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                Description of manuscript partbooks containing motets by Lassus. Discusses connections to the production of the Phalèse-Bellère publishing house.

                                                Find this resource:

                                                • Urch, Katharina. “Das Bußpsalmenwerk für Herzog Albrecht V.” In Orlando di Lasso, Prachthandschriften und Quellenüberlieferung; Aus den Beständen der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München. Edited by Horst Leuchtmann and Hartmut Schaefer, 19–25. Tutzing, Germany: Hans Schneider, 1994.

                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                  Hans Mielich (b. 1516–d. 1573) illustrated the large choirbook (two volumes) containing Lassus’ cycle Septem psalmi poenitentiales. This short introduction relates to Duke Albrecht’s general political idea of art, to Hans Mielich, and to Samuel Quickelberg, who originally devised the concept of the illustrations.

                                                  Find this resource:

                                                  • Vanhulst, Henri. “Le livre de choeur manuscrit de château fort d’Ecaussines-Lalaing (Ec), une source peu connue de la musique de Lassus (1574).” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 266–276. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                    The manuscript contains two masses by Lassus. Physical description, facsimiles.

                                                    Find this resource:

                                                    Facsimiles

                                                    Although many studies concerning prints and manuscripts exist, few sources have been published in facsimile. Leuchtmann 1992 and Owens 1986 are introductions to facsimiles of famous sources; “Bildtafeln aus den Bußpsalmen Kodizes Mus.Ms. A.” (Lassus 1994) is a selection from Mus. Ms. A, the so-called “Mielich-Codex.”

                                                    • Lassus, Orlande de. Psalmi Davidis poenitentiales, Monachii, A. Berg, 1584. Corpus of Early Music 25. Brussels, Belgium: Editions Culture et Civilisation, 1970.

                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                      A simple black and white facsimile, with neither commentary nor physical description, nor any other information.

                                                      Find this resource:

                                                      • Lassus, Orlande de. Le quatoirsiesme livre contenant dixhuyct chansons italiennes, six chansons francoises, & six motetz (Anvers, T. Susato, 1955). Corpus of Early Music 15. Brussels: Editions Culture et Civilisation, 1972.

                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                        A simple black-and-white facsimile, neither commentary nor physical description or other information.

                                                        Find this resource:

                                                        • Lassus, Orlande de. “Bildtafeln aus den Bußpsalmen Kodizes Mus. ms. A.” In Orlando di Lasso, Prachthandschriften und Quellenüberlieferung: Aus den Beständen der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek in München. Edited by Horst Leuchtmann and Hartmut Schaefer, 127–168. Tutzing, Germany: Hans Schneider, 1994.

                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                          Forty (of around four hundred) pages in color facsimile. See also “Erläuterungen zu den Bildtafeln nach Samuel van Quickelberg” (pp. 169–186).

                                                          Find this resource:

                                                          • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Einführung.” In Orlando di Lasso, Il Primo Libro de Mottetti, Superius. Antwerpen, Johann Laet 1556, 5–16. Peer, Belgium: Alamire, 1992.

                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                            An introduction to the book and its content, with a physical description.

                                                            Find this resource:

                                                            • Owens, Jessie Ann. “Introduction.” In Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Musiksammlung, Mus. Hs. 18.744. Edited by Jessie Ann Owens, v–ix. Renaissance Music in Facsimile 25. New York and London: Garland, 1986.

                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                              Physical description, content, and significance of the four partbooks. The author discovered independently from Hell 1984 (cited under Source Studies) that Jean Pollet rather than the composer wrote the manuscript.

                                                              Find this resource:

                                                              Editions

                                                              The history of editing Lassus’ works began in the early 19th century, but a complete edition was not begun before 1894, the anniversary of Lassus’ death (1594). Haberl and Sandberger 1973 (Sämmtliche Werke, begun in 1894) was not initially completed, and the missing works were edited in Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995 (Neue Reihe), beginning in 1956. Leuchtmann and Schmid 1968– is a new, completely revised edition of Haberl and Sandberger 1973, based on all the prints and important manuscript sources. In addition to these editions, two important modern editions are offered: Bernstein 1987 (Lassus’ chansons) and Bergquist, et al. 1995–2007 (his motets), both following editional principles different from Haberl and Sandberger 1973, Leuchtmann and Schmid 1968–, and Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995. Several additional editions of some of Lassus’ works exist, some of which are of historical interest. Leuchtmann 1977 is an edition of Lassus’ letters, and two letters missing there are published in Huth 1989 and Leuchtmann 1985.

                                                              • Bergquist, Peter, et al. Orlando di Lasso: The Complete Motets. 11 vols. and supplement. Middleton, WI: A-R Editions, 1995–2007.

                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                Alternative edition to Haberl and Sandberger 1973 for the motets. The order of compositions follows the first prints. Normally only one source is used. The edition uses modern clefs and original values. Each volume has a substantial introduction and critical notes.

                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                • Bernstein, Jane A. Orlande de Lassus: Chansons. 4 vols. New York and London: Garland, 1987.

                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                  Alternative edition to Haberl and Sandberger 1973 for the chansons. The disposition follows the text incipits in alphabetical order. The edition uses modern clefs, the values are shortened. Most the pieces are edited after Mellange d’Orlande de Lassus (Paris: Le Roy & Ballard, 1570), a collection containing the majority of Lassus’ chansons until 1570. Some of them were first published in Mellange. The volumes have only one short introduction and no critical notes.

                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                  • Boetticher, Wolfgang, et al., eds. Orlando di Lasso: Sämtliche Werke, neue Reihe. 26 vols. New York, and Kassel, West Germany: Bärenreiter, 1956–1995.

                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                    Tthese volumes include all the works missing in Haberl and Sandberger 1973. Volume 1 contains motets, chansons and madrigals not in Haberl and Sandberger 1973. The other volumes contain the passions, masses, Magnificat, hymns, lectiones, Lagrime di San Pietro, Prophetiae Sibyllarum, Lamentationes Jeremiae Prophetae, smaller liturgical works, and the Penitential Psalms. The edition uses modern clefs but original values. Each volume begins with an introduction and has critical notes. Information on the work is available online from IMSLP.

                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                    • Haberl, Franz Xaver, and Adolf Sandberger, eds. Orlando di Lasso: Sämmtliche Werke. 21 vols. New York: Broude Brothers, 1973.

                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                      First published in Leipzig by Breitkopf & Härtel, 1894–1926. These volumes contain nearly all motets, madrigals, chansons and German lieder. The editors normally used only one source, and not always the most reliable. The motets, for example are edited following the Magnum opus musicum, a collection of almost all of Lassus’ motets edited in 1604 by his sons. The edition uses original clefs and note-values. Each volume begins with an introduction. Information on the work is available online from IMSLP.

                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                      • Huth, Volkhard. “Orlando di Lasso und Graf Heinrich von Fürstenberg. Zu einem bislang unveröffentlichten Brief Lassos vom 29. April 1588.” Zeitschrift für bayerische Landesgeschichte 52 (1989): 609–614.

                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                        Edition and commentary to a letter, hitherto unpublished, to Heinrich von Fürstenberg. Lassus reminds Fürstenberg that he had sent him Magnificats, and that Fürstenberg had promised him some compensation.

                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                        • Leuchtmann, Horst. Orlando di Lasso: Briefe. Wiesbaden, West Germany: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1977.

                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                          Edition and translation of a letter (with commentary in footnotes) to fifty-seven letters, some of which are full of humor and fun. Twelve are reproduced as facsimiles. Many of the letters were written by Lassus to Wilhelm V before 1579, when Wilhelm became duke. The letters characterize the composer’s personality.

                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                          • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Ein neugefundener Lasso-Brief.” In Festschrift für Rudolf Elvers zum 60. Geburtstag. Edited by Ernst Herttrich and Hans Schneider, 349–357. Tutzing, West Germany: Hans Schneider, 1985.

                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                            Edition and translation of a letter (with commentary) to the emperor Rudolf II, hitherto unknown. Lassus asks for a personal printing license, which he received in 1581.

                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                            • Leuchtmann, Horst, and Bernhold Schmid, eds. Orlando di Lasso: Sämtliche Werke, Zweite, nach den Quellen revidierte Auflage der Ausgabe. Wiesbaden, West Germany: Breitkopf und Härtel, 1968–.

                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                              The second edition follows the general plan of Haberl and Sandberger 1973, but all prints (plus important manuscript sources) are consulted and discussed in a critical report. Normally the edition follows a source other than that used in the first edition. Presently all chansons and lieder, parts of the madrigals and of the motets have been published. The edition uses original clefs and note-values. Introductions from the first edition are reprinted and annotated. Each volume adds a second introduction.

                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                              Style and Technique

                                                                              “Expression of text” could be considered the most characteristic feature of Lassus’ style, a characteristic that leads to marked contrasts within compositions: imitation alternates with homophonic style, full choir alternates with two or three part sections, and long note values (breves) are contrasted with shorter note values. Lassus was normally conservative in his use of chromaticism, but some passages become extremely chromatic (Prophetiae Sibyllarum, motets such as Alma nemes or Anna, mihi dilecta, veni). A further important compositional practice of Lassus is his obscuring of boundaries between genres. This section of the bibliography offers a limited number of titles that treat the composer’s general style and compositional technique. A brief survey is given in Bossuyt and Schmid 2003 (cited under Reference Works). Questions of compositional technique are discussed in Groß 1977, Just 1996, and Schlötterer 1996, while Leuchtmann 1999 focuses on text-underlay.

                                                                              • Groß, Horst-Willi. Klangliche Struktur und Klangverhältnis in Messen und Motetten Orlando di Lassos. Tutzing, West Germany: Hans Schneider, 1977.

                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                Discusses the connections and relationships of sounds and structures in Lassus’ motets and masses.

                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                • Just, Martin. “Intensität durch Stimmenführung in Lassos Klangprogressionen.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 113–131. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                  Lassus often uses unusual patterns of voice-leading in his compositions: in many cases he does not necessarily follow the most direct paths between pitches, but employs large leaps and changes of register as a means of intensification. Just gives a systematic list of possibilities and illustrates them with many detailed descriptions of examples.

                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                  • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Correct and Incorrect Accentuation in Lasso’s Music: on the Implied Dependence on the Text in Classical Vocal Polyphony.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 227–246. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                    DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                    Discusses the differences in the underlaying of syllables as a way to obtain variety and liveliness. Examples taken from Lassus and Palestrina.

                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                    • Schlötterer, Reinhold. “Quintstruktur, aber keine Quintparallelen.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 243–249. Munich, Germany: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                      The author uses Lassus’ Ad te, perenne gaudium as starting point to show compositions based on structural (i.e., sounding, not composed) parallel fifths. Compares Lassus with several other composers. Many musical examples.

                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                      Studies on Genres and Works

                                                                                      Lassus composed in all genres practiced in his time, sacred as well as secular. An overview of the different genres is given in the Roche 1982 book.

                                                                                      • Roche, Jerome. Lassus. London and New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                        Short introductions to the motets, the masses, other liturgical works, madrigals and villanellas, chansons, and German lieder. Musical examples.

                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                        Masses

                                                                                        Approximately sixty masses can be attributed to Lassus without qualification. Many are composed on models (parody masses). Prior to Siegfried Hermelinks edition of all the masses attributed to Lassus (Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995—volumes 3–12, 1962–1975, see Editions), studies of the composer’s masses were impeded by missing editions. A first overview is given in Huschke 1940. Orlich 1985 is a comprehensive study on Lassus’ parody/imitation masses. The other studies cited here are articles concerning single works or aspects of Lassus’ works: Hell 1985 and Leuchtmann 1980 discuss formerly unknown masses or mass settings, while Steinhardt 1966 examines the authorship of the Missa Si me tenes. Haar 1999 and Mahrt 2006 discuss the function and style of Lassus’ Missa Sesquialtera.

                                                                                        • Haar, James. “A Wedding Mass by Lasso.” Journal of Musicology 17.1 (1999): 112–135.

                                                                                          DOI: 10.2307/764013Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                          The author assumes that the so-called Missa Sesquialtera was performed in Augsburg at the wedding of the sisters Maria Jacobina and Anna Maria Fugger to Octavianus Secundus Fugger and Wilhelm (or Philipp) von Rechberg. He supposes that the mass is based on an unidentified German lied.

                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                          • Hell, Helmut. “Ein unbekanntes ‘Dies irae’ von Orlando di Lasso.” Musik in Bayern 31 (1985): 29–41.

                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                            A source from the Munich Frauenkirche gives evidence that a Dies irae formerly transmitted anonymously was composed by Lassus. Musical examples.

                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                            • Hermelink, Siegfried. “Jägermesse: Beitrag zu einer Begriffsbestimmung.” Die Musikforschung 18 (1965): 29–33.

                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                              Lassus’ short Missa Jager was sung before the hunt, and thus had to be short.

                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                              • Huschke, Joachim. “Orlando di Lassos Messen.” Archiv für Musikforschung 5 (1940): 84–103, 153–178.

                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                Early important study of Lassus’ masses.

                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Drei bisher unbekannte Parodiemessen von Morales, Lechner und Lasso: Neufunde in einer Neresheimer Handschrift von 1578.” Musik in Bayern 20 (1980): 15–37.

                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                  Presents a formerly unknown mass by Lassus based on his own chanson De tout mon coeur. Only the Vagans (Tenor secundus) is preserved. Contains facsimiles and an edition of the preserved voice.

                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                  • Mahrt, William. “On the Style of Lasso’s Missa Sesquialtera.” In Die Münchner Hofkapelle des 16. Jahrhunderts im europäischen Kontext, Bericht über das internationale Symposion der Musikhistorischen Kommission der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Verbindung mit der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte, München, 2–4 August 2004. Edited by Theodor Göllner and Bernhold Schmid, 415–433. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission beim Verlag C. H. Beck, 2006.

                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                    Discusses style of the mass with its mannerist changes of tempo, while no word-painting or chromaticism is used. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                    • Orlich, Rufina. Die Parodiemessen von Orlando di Lasso. Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 1985.

                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                      The first study concerning a section of Lassus’ masses based on Hermelinks edition. Detailed descriptions on style, technique, and relation to the models used. Orlich also compares Lassus’ work with parody masses by other composers based on the same model. Contains many musical examples.

                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                      • Steinhardt, Milton. “The Missa Si me tenes: A Problem of Authorship.” In Aspects of Medieval and Renaissance Music. A Birthday Offering to Gustave Reese. Edited by Jan LaRue, 756–767. New York: W. W. Norton, 1966.

                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                        The Missa Si me tenes is attributed to Lassus and Jacob Vaet in various sources. Discusses the authorship and assumes Lassus as composer.

                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                        Magnificats

                                                                                                        Lassus composed more than one hundred Magnificats. The first three sets (eight pieces à 6, à 5, and à 4, ordered modaly) were published in 1567 (Nürnberg: Theodor Gerlach). After Wilhelm V introduced the post-tridentine rite in the Munich court, Lassus had to compose many Magnificats for the Vespers, many of which were based on secular models. In 1619 Lassus’ son Rudolph edited a set of one hundred Magnificats (Munich: Nikolaus Heinrich), forty-six of which were printed for the first time. Erb 1978 is an overview on all Magnificat settings attributed to Lassus, Erb 1993 ascribes a Magnificat to Lassus, while formal aspects are discussed in Erb 1999. Crook 1994 is a comprehensive study on Lassus’ “Imitation Magnificat.”

                                                                                                        • Crook, David. Orlando di Lasso’s Imitation Magnificats for Counter-Reformation Munich. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994.

                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                          Lassus composed several Magnificats on vernacular models. The author replaces the term “Parody Magnificat” with “Imitation Magnificat.” Lassus’ appropriation of madrigals and chansons as compositional models for Magnificat settings constitutes an elevation of the source material. Crook discusses the liturgical and cultural contexts and the compositional practice.

                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                          • Erb, James. “Orlando di Lasso’s First Magnificat Publication: A Contribution to the Complete Edition. With Commentary.” 2 vols. PhD diss., Harvard University, 1978.

                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                            The first volume publishes Lassus’ Magnificats (pp. 1–24; see Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995, Volume 13, cited under Editions). The second volume gives an overview of all Magnificat settings attributed to Lassus, including information on sources, chronology, and parody technique, when it is used.

                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                            • Erb, James. “On Orlando di Lassos ‘Ljubljana’ Magnificat Setting.” In Festschrift für Horst Leuchtmann zum 65: Geburtstag. Edited by Stephan Hörner and Bernhold Schmid, 127–134. Tutzing, Germany: Hans Schneider, 1993.

                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                              Ascribes a Magnificat in a manuscript in Ljubljana to Lassus.

                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                              • Erb, James. “Aspects of form in Orlando di Lasso’s Magnificat settings.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 1–19. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                Discusses the possibilities that Lassus used alternatim (polyphony changing with plainsong or organ), or polyphony as a whole, in his formal concept of the Magnificat. Also discusses the question of using a model.

                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                Passions

                                                                                                                Only the Passio secundum Matthaeum, printed in 1575, was definitively composed by Lassus. The passions secundum Marcum, Lucam, and Ioannem are transmitted anonymously. Yet based on their sources, style, and notation, they likewise should be considered works of Lassus. All are composed as responsorial passions. No secondary literature has been dedicated to the passions, thus Kurt von Fischers introduction in Sämtliche Werke: Neue Reihe (Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995), Volume 2, must form the literature for future works.

                                                                                                                • Boetticher, Wolfgang, et al. Orlando di Lasso: Sämtliche Werke, Neue Reihe. 26 vols. New York, and Kassel, West Germany: Bärenreiter, 1956–1995.

                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                  In the introduction to volume 2, the author discusses questions of attribution as well as aspects of the formal concept and performance practice.

                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                  Lectiones

                                                                                                                  Lassus composed three cycles of lectiones: Sacrae lectiones ex Propheta Iob (containing nine lectiones), and Lectiones matutinae de nativitate Christi (three lectiones), and Lectiones sacrae novem ex libris Hiob (nine lectiones). Göllner 1996 discusses the tradition of Lassus’ Lectiones matutinae, Winemiller 1993 focuses on the function of the Sacrae lectiones ex propheta Iob.

                                                                                                                  • Göllner, Theodor. “Lassos Lectiones Matutinae und ihre Vorläufer.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 101–112. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                    Shows Lassus’ lectiones matutinae as part of a tradition first found in the manuscript Trent 91. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                    • Winemiller, John T. “Lasso, Albrecht V, and the Figure of Job: Speculation on the History and Function of Lassos’s Sacrae lectiones ex propheta Iob and Vienna Mus. Ms. 18.744.” The Journal of Musicological Research 12.4 (1993): 273–302.

                                                                                                                      DOI: 10.1080/01411899308574671Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                      Lassus’ cycles of lections, like his Prophetiae Sibyllarum, transmitted in the same source (Vienna, Mus. Ms. 18.744), were private devotional music composed for Albrecht V.

                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                      Hymns

                                                                                                                      In 1580‑1581 Lassus composed a cycle of hymns for the Munich Hofkapelle transmitted in Mus. Ms. 55 in Bayerische Staatsbibliothek. That was necessary because Wilhelm V changed the liturgy from the Freising rite to the post-tridentine Roman rite. Zager 1985 is a comprehensive study on Lassus’ hymns, Zager 1999 gives an overview.

                                                                                                                      • Zager, Daniel. “The Polyphonic Latin Hymns of Orlando di Lasso: a Liturgical and Repertorial Study.” PhD diss., University of Minnesota, 1985.

                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                        Comprehensive discussion of Lassus’ polyphonic hymns for Vespers (thirty-two pieces) and their liturgical context, composed in connection with the liturgical reform in the Munich Hofkapelle in 1580–1581 after Wilhelm V became Bavarian duke (1579). The repertoire of this cycle is congruent with the content of Vespers hymns in the Tridentine Breviarium Romanum of 1568.

                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                        • Zager, Daniel. “Post-Tridentine Liturgical Change and Functional Music: Lasso’s Cycle of Polyphonic Latin Hymns.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 41–63. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                          DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                          Overview of Lassus’ hymn cycle and its liturgical contexts.

                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                          Other Liturgical Works

                                                                                                                          For the various services in the Munich Hofkapelle, Lassus was required to compose liturgical pieces, such as Nunc dimittis, propers for both Mass and Office, and litanies. Some of them are transmitted anonymously in the Munich choirbooks, and it is not always clear whether Lassus was the composer. Bergquist 1986 is an overview of Lassus’ Nunc dimittis. Bergquist 1993 and Haggh 1995 discuss Lassus’ authorship of some anonymous pieces for the Mass and the Office. Heinzel 1998 focuses on Lassus’ Salve Regina and the Munich tradition. Roth 1960 gives a short overview on Lassus’ and Palestrinas litanies. Schwemer 1998 is a short chapter on Lassus within a comprehensive study on responsories.

                                                                                                                          • Bergquist, Peter: “Orlando di Lasso’s Nunc dimittis-Vertonungen.” Musik in Bayern 33 (1986): 5–28.

                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                            Discusses Lassus’ authorship of anonymous Nunc dimittis-settings. Offers some remarks on the performance practice of Nunc dimittis.

                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                            • Bergquist, Peter: “The Anonymous Propers in Munich Mss. 32 and 76: Are They Previously Unknown Works by Orlando di Lasso?” Acta Musicologica 65.1 (1993): 4–22.

                                                                                                                              DOI: 10.2307/932643Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                              Discusses Lassus’ authorship of anonymous propers for Mass and Office in the Munich Mss. 32 and 76, based on stylistic criteria. Full contents of both manuscripts are listed. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                              • Haggh, Barbara. “Orlando di Lasso and Office Polyphony for the Bavarian Court.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 233–247. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                Most of the Office polyphony in the Munich choirbooks, edited by Peter Bergquist in volume 24 of Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995 (cited under Editions), is transmitted anonymously. The author compares anonymous settings with settings ascribed to Lassus, and points out differences in style and technique.

                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                • Heinzel, Alexander. “Orlando di Lasso und die Münchner ‘Salve Regina’–Tradition.” Musik in Bayern 55 (1998): 143–158.

                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                  Lassus composed seven Salve Regina-settings for the Munich Hofkapelle; one in falsobordone style is to be found in a print from 1586. In addition, there are two apocryphal choral settings. Heinzel gives an overview on the Munich Salve Regina tradition, and discusses Lassus’ pieces. With facsimiles and musical examples.

                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                  • Roth, Joachim. “Zum Litaneischaffen G. P. da Palestrinas und O. di Lassos.” Kirchenmusikalisches Jahrbuch 44 (1960): 44–49.

                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                    This short overview has been superseded by Peter Bergquist’s introduction in volume 25 of Sämtliche Werke: Neue Reihe (Boetticher, et al. 1956–1995, cited under Editions).

                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                    • Schwemer, Bettina. “Orlando di Lasso.” In Mehrstimmige Responsorienvertonungen in deutschen Quellen des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts. Vol. 1, Texxteil. Edited by Bettina Schwemer, 138–142. Augsburg, Germany: Wißner-Verlag, 1998.

                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                      Discusses formal conception and style of Lassus’ responsories: Liturgical Gebrauchsmusik. The homorhythmic declamation of text renders it understandable, though the meaning of the words is expressed through musical rhetoric.

                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                      Motets

                                                                                                                                      The more than five hundred motets represent perhaps the most important part of Lassus’ work, particularly if considered from the perspective of theorists like Praetorius. In 1604 the composer’s sons, Ferdinand and Rudolph, prepared a collection with nearly all motets attributed to their father (516 pieces). Studies concerning Lassus’s motets as a whole include Balmer 1938 (composition-technique) and Leuchtmann 1959 (expression of texts). Prints, and their contents and contexts, are discussed in Lowinsky 1989 (the Antwerp motet book, 1556), McGuinness 1990 (the first volume of the Patrocinium musices, 1573) and Schmid 2008 (the bicinia, 1577).

                                                                                                                                      • Balmer, Lucie. Orlando di Lassos Motetten: Eine stilgeschichtliche Studie. Bern, Switzerland and Leipzig: Paul Haupt, 1938.

                                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                        A very important early study of Lassus’ motets, focused especially on motives, their generation and structure, and their influence on the form of the motets. Does not have footnotes or bibliography.

                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                        • Haar, James. “Orlande de Lassus: Si bona suscepimus.” In Models of Musical Analysis: Music before 1600. Edited by Mark Everist, 154–174. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1992.

                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                          Analyzes particularly Lassus’ motet (formal structure, musical procedure) and compares it with compositions on the same text by other composers (Verdelot, Costanzo Porta). Musical examples and an edition of Lassus’ motet.

                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                          • Leuchtmann, Horst. Die musikalischen Wortausdeutungen in den Motetten des Magnum opus musicum von Orlando di Lasso. Baden-Baden, West Germany: Valentin Koerner, 1959.

                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                            A comprehensive study of Lassus’ art of treating words as symbols through musical means in his motets.

                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                            • Lowinsky, Edward E. “Orlando di Lasso’s Antwerp Motet Book and its Relationship to the Contemporary Netherlandish Motet.” In Music in the Culture of the Renaissance and Other Essays. 2 vols. By Edward Lowinsky. Edited by Bonnie J. Blackburn, 385–431. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.

                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                              An analysis of Lassus’ motets printed in the Antwerp motet book (Antwerp, Belgium: Jean Laet, 1556). Revised and translated version of Lowinsky’s doctoral dissertation, published in German in Tijdschrift der Vereeniging voor Nederlandsche Muziekgeschiedenis 14 (1935): 185–229; and 15 (1936–1939): 1–43 and 94–105.

                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                              • McGuinness, Nanette C. “Orlando di Lasso’s Motets in the Patrocinium Musices, Volume 1 (1573).” PhD diss., University of California, Berkeley, 1990.

                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                A comprehensive study of the source (the first volume of the Patrocinium Musices) and the style of the motets, including analyses of some motets.

                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                • Schmid, Bernhold. “. . .nec non Tyronibus quàm eius artis peritioribus summopere inserviente:. Zur gedruckten Überlieferung von Lassos Bicinien.” In Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 6. Edited by Bruno Bouckaert and Eugeen Schreurs, 177–203. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 2008.

                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                  A survey of the printed transmission of the bicinia (motets and ricercari for two voices) by Lassus. The pieces were transposed, the note values were changed, and arrangements for three voices are found. Seth Calvisius changed some passages in his 1612 edition.

                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                  Specific Works

                                                                                                                                                  Panagl 2004 focuses on “Huldigungsmotetten”; Haar 1997 gives an overview of motets based on a Cantus firmus; and single pieces are discussed in Harrán 1995, Körndle 1996, and Lampert 2000.

                                                                                                                                                  • Harrán, Don. “The Joseph Story as Told by Orlando di Lasso.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 249–269. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                    Lassus composed two works based on the Genesis story of Joseph: one is a Latin motet (Dixit Joseph), the other is a German lied (Joseph verkauffet ist, Part 5 of Die Gnad kombt oben her). Compares the works with earlier and later pieces treating the Joseph story.

                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                    • Haar, James. “Lasso as Historicist: The Cantus-Firmus Motets.” In Hearing the Motet: Essays on the Motet of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Edited by Dolores Pesce, 265–285. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.

                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                      An overview on Lassus’ fifteen motets based on a cantus firmus. An appendix gives the texts, the cantus firmus (text and music, with musical examples), and some remarks.

                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                      • Körndle, Franz. “Motettenform bei Lasso und ihre liturgischen Vorbilder.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 157–166. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                        Two additional sections were added to Lassus’ motet Angelus domini descendit de caelo, Part II: Nolite timere, namely, Et introeuntes and Gloria patri; thereby the motet could be used as responsory. Contains an edition of Et intreuntes and Gloria patri from Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Mus. Ms. 14.

                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                        • Lampert, Vera. “Lasso’s Fleas: A Hungarian Connection for a European Topos.” Studia Musicologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 41 (2000): 57–75.

                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                          This study on Bestia curvafia pulices shows the musical manifestations of the popular flea topos. Lassus’ text comes from Hungary, as can be seen in a Hungarian swearword and a Hungarian town used in the text.

                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                          • Panagl, Victoria. Lateinische Huldigungsmotetten für Angehörige des Hauses Habsburg: Vertonte Gelegenheitsdichtung im Rahmen neulateinischer Herrscherpanegyrik. Frankfurt am Main and New York: P. Lang, 2004.

                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                            A comprehensive study on “Huldigungsmotetten” dedicated to members of the Habsburg family, and not limited to Lassus. Discusses text, music, and contexts. The index (pp. 9–11) is helpful in finding the parts of the book concerning Lassus.

                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                            Penitential Psalms

                                                                                                                                                            In the years short before 1560 Lassus had to compose the seven Penitential Psalms for the duke’s private use. He was not allowed to publish the cycle until 1584, five years after the duke’s death. The cycle was copied into a fully illuminated manuscript (Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Mus. ms. A, two volumes), the painter was Hans Mielich. The concept for the programme of illuminations was created by Samuel Quickelberg. A comprehensive study on different cycles of the Penitential Psalms with a long chapter on Lassus is Mayer 2004. Single aspects of Lassus’ cycle are discussed in Bossuyt 1994 (the scribe Jean stole the manuscript), Crook 1996 (a performance in 1580) and Schulze 1984 (modality).

                                                                                                                                                            • Bossuyt, Ignace. “The Copyist Jean Pollet and the Theft in 1563 of Orlandus Lassus’ ‘Secret’ Penitential Psalms.” In From Ciconia to Sweelinck: Donum natalicium Willem Elders. Edited by Albert Clement and Eric Jas, 261–267. Chloe Beihefte zum Daphnis 21. Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi B. V., 1994.

                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                              A letter from Johann Jakob Fugger to Cardinal Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle (23 August 1563) states that Jean Pollet stole the manuscript copies and took them to the Southern Netherlands, his native country.

                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                              • Crook, David. “A Performance of Lasso’s Penitential Psalms on Maundy Thursday 1580.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 69–77. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                Lassus’ Penitential Psalms were musica reservata published only in 1584. It is not really clear that these pieces were performed as part of the Marian congregations’ Maundy Thursday observances in the Munich Jesuit Gymnasium, but serious studies of the activities of the Jesuits in Munich will contribute to our understanding some aspects of Lassus’ life and work in Munich. Archival material in appendices.

                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                • Mayer, Sonja. “Orlando di Lasso: Psalmi Davidis Poenitentiales (ca. 1559).” In Studien zu den lateinischen Bußpsalmen-Zyklen des 16. Jahrhunderts. Vol. 1. By Sonja Mayer, 29–80. Augsburg, Germany: Wißner-Verlag, 2004.

                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                  Although the general tradition of composing the seven penitential psalms began earlier, Lassus’ cycle initiated a flood of compositions. Describes Lassus’ cycle in particular. A table (pp. 76–80) gives an overview of the formal and tonal structure.

                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                  • Schulze, Stefan. Die Tonarten in Lassos “Bußpsalmen” mit einem Vergleich von Alexander Utendals und Jacob Reiners “Bußpsalmen.” Neuhausen-Stuttgart, West Germany: Hänssler, 1984.

                                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                    Analyzes the modes as used for the musical expression of text. Compares Utendal’s and Reiner’s cycles with that of Lassus.

                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                    Prophetiae Sibyllarum

                                                                                                                                                                    An early cycle of thirteen pieces, composed about 1555, famous for its highly chromatic composition. The first piece represents a prologue, the following pieces the prophecies of the Sibylls. The chromaticism is one the main aspects in literature, as seen in Berger 1985–1986 and in Hübler 1978. Lake 1991 gives an overview of different analytical approaches, while Bergquist 1979 identifies the texts.

                                                                                                                                                                    • Berger, Karol. “The Common and the Unusual Steps of Musica ficta: A Background for the Gamut of Orlando di Lasso’s Prophetiae Sibyllarum.” Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenschap 39–40 (1985–1986): 61–73.

                                                                                                                                                                      DOI: 10.2307/3686971Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                      In the middle of the16th-century the most extensive gamut available for practical music contained seventeen pitches within an octave (in keyboard terms, seven white and five divided black keys). In his Prophetiae Sibyllarum, Lassus does not use all the possibilities available in his times.

                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                      • Bergquist, Peter: “The Poems of Orlando di Lasso’s Prophetiae Sibyllarum and Their Sources.” Journal of the American Musicological Society 32.3 (1979): 516–538.

                                                                                                                                                                        DOI: 10.2307/831253Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                        The author identifies the origins of the texts.

                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                        • Hübler, Klaus-Karl. “Orlando di Lassos Prophetiae Sibyllarum oder über chromatische Komposition im 16. Jahrhundert.” Zeitschrift für Musiktheorie 9 (1978): 29–34.

                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                          A short survey of chromaticism as used by Lassus in his Prophetiae, based on the background of chromaticism in the 16th century.

                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                          • Lake, William E. “Orlando di Lasso’s Prologue to Prophetiae Sibyllarum: A Comparison of Analytic Approaches.” In Theory Only 11.7–8 (1991): 1–19.

                                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                            Lake discusses earlier analytic approaches and adds his own analysis.

                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                            Madrigals and Other Italian-Texted Works

                                                                                                                                                                            Lassus lived in Italy between 1544 and 1554. Thus, he knew the different Italian genres: the madrigal, the villanelle, and the morescha. When he resided in Munich, he likewise composed and published Italian-texted pieces (around 175). Sandberger 1903–1904 gives an overview on Lassus and Italian literature. Cardamone Jackson 2008, Ehrmann-Herfort 2010, and Haar 1985–1986 show Italian influences on Lassus when he lived in Italy. Haar 2006, Lewis 1999, and Luisi 1995 are focused on analysis and description. Haar 1995 discusses Lassus’ fourth book of madrigals.

                                                                                                                                                                            • Cardamone Jackson, Donna G. “Orlando di Lasso et al.: A New Reading of the Roman Villanella Book (1555).” In Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 6. Edited by Bruno Bouckaert and Eugeen Schreurs, 125–146. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 2008.

                                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                              The villanelle for three voices published in Rome in 1550s, especially the 1555 anthology printed by Dorico with Lassus’ name on the title page, were received and reworked in northern Europe.

                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                              • Ehrmann-Herfort, Sabine. “Das Madrigal in Rom um 1550. Lasso, Palestrina und die Madrigali ariosi.” In Musik des Mittelalters und der Renaissance. Festschrift Klaus-Jürgen Sachs zum 80. Geburtstag. Edited by Rainer Kleinertz, Christoph Flamm, and Wolf Frobenius, 443–459. Hildesheim, Germany, and New York: Olms, 2010.

                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                Compares Palestrina’s and Lassus’ compositions for Petrarch’s Deh, hor foss’io, and shows Roman influences on Lassus.

                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                • Haar, James. “The Early Madrigals of Lassus.” Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenschap 39–40 (1985–1986): 17–32.

                                                                                                                                                                                  DOI: 10.2307/3686969Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                  Details of their publishing history and stylistic traits leads the author to assume that a significant number of the composer’s early madrigals were composed while he lived in Italy. He was influenced by Roman composers in the circle of Antonio Barré, as well as Venetian composers such as Cipriano de Rore.

                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                  • Haar, James. “Le Muse in Germania: Lasso’s Fourth Book of Madrigals.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 49–72. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                    Lassus’ fourth book of madrigals was composed in Germany, but dedicated to Alfonso II d’Este, duke of Ferrara. This was Lassus’ first dedication within a set of madrigals. The author discusses whether Lassus was interested in entering the duke’s service.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                    • Haar, James. “Lasso’s Later Madrigals.” In Die Münchner Hofkapelle des 16. Jahrhunderts im europäischen Kontext: Bericht über das internationale Symposion der Musikhistorischen Kommission der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Verbindung mit der Gesellschaft für Bayerische Musikgeschichte, München, 2–4 August 2004. Edited by Theodor Göllner and Bernhold Schmid, 389–401. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission beim Verlag C. H. Beck, 2006.

                                                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                      Analyzes Lassus’ later madrigal style in terms of their formal cyclical layout, melodic form, and contrapuntal construction. The article is based on the six madrigals published in the Four-Language print (1573).

                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                      • Lewis, Mary S. “Lasso’s ‘Standomi un giorno’ and the canzone in the mid-sixteenth century.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 91–115. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                                                                                        DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                        Beginning in the middle of the 1540s until to the end of the century, the canzone (a madrigal containing more than one stanza) was popular. Lewis discusses the formal structure of Lassus’ canzone, particularly based on the modal organization.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                        • Luisi, Francesco. “Musica e Poesia in ‘Honorato ridotto’: Per una analisi dei Madrigali a cinque voci Libro Quinto di Lasso.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 73–87. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                          Lassus’ fifth book of madrigals, printed in Nürnberg in 1585 (Catharina Gerlach), and its dedication to Mario Bevilacqua.

                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                          • Sandberger, Adolf. “Roland Lassus’ Beziehungen zur italienischen Literatur.” Sammelbände der Internationalen Musikgesellschaft 5 (1903–1904): 402–441.

                                                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                            First overview of authors and various genres of Italian literature set by Lassus.

                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                            Lagrime di San Pietro

                                                                                                                                                                                            This is a cycle of spiritual madrigals taken from Luigi Tansillo’s Lagrime di San Pietro. Twenty Italian madrigals are followed by the motet Vide homo. This was Lassus’ “swansong,” composed in 1594, and published in 1595. An overview is given in Jensch 1986, Fisher 2007 discusses the cycle in the context of Counter-Reformation, and Luoma 1989 shows the relationship between modality and texts.

                                                                                                                                                                                            • Fisher, Alexander J. “‘Per mia particolare devotione’: Orlando di Lasso’s Lagrime di San Pietro and Catholic Spirituality in Counter-Reformation Munich.” Journal of the Royal Musical Association 132.2 (2007): 167–220.

                                                                                                                                                                                              DOI: 10.1093/jrma/fkm006Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                              Discusses the contexts of Lassus’ cycle, viewed as an example of Counter-Reformation meditation and penance.

                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                              • Jensch, Fritz. “Orlando di Lassos Lagrime di San Pietro und ihr Text.” Musik in Bayern 32 (1986): 43–62.

                                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                The author, editor of the Lagrime in Boetticher et al. 1956–1995 (cited under Editions), corrects some erroneous information presented in earlier publications. He gives an overview of the cycle’s tonality and shows symbolic as well as theological associations and relationships.

                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                • Luoma, Robert C. Music, Mode and Words in Orlando di Lasso’s Last Works. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen, 1989.

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Analyzes the Lagrime with respect to the modes and their relationship to the text. English translation of the texts, musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Chansons

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Lassus composed around 150 French chansons, most of them published in Paris (Le Roy & Ballard). Many of them were published by Huguenot editors as contrafacta, substituting erotic or drinking texts with devotional or moral texts. Sandberger 1906‑1907 is an overview on Lassus’ relation to French literature. A survey on Lassus’ chansons and their stylistic development is provided by Dobbins 1995, while Dobbins 1985–1986 shows how Lassus influenced and was influenced by other composers. Freedman 1995 and Freedman 2000 deal with the Huguenot contrafacta on Lassus’ chansons.

                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Dobbins, Frank. “Lassus—Borrower or Lender: The Chansons.” Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenschap 39–40 (1985–1986): 101–157.

                                                                                                                                                                                                    DOI: 10.2307/3686974Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                    Explores Lassus’ chansons from the perspective of his literary and musical sources, as well as his influence on contemporary and later composers. Lists all pieces composed by Lassus, together with parallel compositions (columns for composers, sources, voices, mode, form, length of pieces and models). Discusses each chanson, with many musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Dobbins, Frank. “Textual Sources and Compositional Techniques in the French Chansons of Orlandus de Lassus.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 139–161. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                      A survey of the evolving and fluctuating output of chansons by Lassus. Dobbins indicates his models (music and text), but also investigates his stylistic development and his musical independence.

                                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Freedman, Richard. “‘Divins Accords’: The Lassus Chansons and their Protestant Readers of the Late Sixteenth Century.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994 Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 273–294. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                        An overview of questions concerning Lassus’ chansons published by Huguenot editors with changed texts.

                                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Freedman, Richard. The Chansons of Orlando di Lasso and Their Protestant Listeners: Music, Piety, and Print in Sixteenth-Century France. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2000.

                                                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                          An excellent comprehensive study on Lassus’ chansons, especially as seen by “their protestant listeners” and their goals. In adopting “better” texts, the Huguenots tried to improve the chansons. An appendix gives the prefaces of Huguenot editions, in their original French language and in translation.

                                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Sandberger, Adolf. “Roland Lassus’ Beziehungen zu Frankreich und zur französischen Literatur.” Sammelbände der Internationalen Musikgesellschaft 8.3 (1906–1907): 355–401.

                                                                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                            First overview of the composer’s relation to France, French literature, his chansons, and the Huguenot contrafacta. Reprinted in Haberl and Sandberger 1973, volume 12, VIII–XXXIX, and in Leuchtmann and Schmid 1968, volume 12, VIII–XXXIX (both cited under Editions).

                                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                            German Lied

                                                                                                                                                                                                            Lassus composed somewhat less than one hundred German lieder and psalm texts. Beginning in his first lied publication (1567) many of his lieder were influenced by Italian and French stylistic elements, though he also composed lieder in traditional German style (Tenorlied). Sandberger in Haberl and Sandberger 1973 gives a first overview on Lassus’ German lieder, Just 1995 and Just 1994 deal with compositional techniques, while Schwindt 2001 gives a detailed analysis of the “Nasenlied,” style and context.

                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Just, Martin. “Lassos mehrteilige deutsche Lieder zu fünf Stimmen.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 163–179. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                              In examining Lassus’ Lieder à five, containing several movements or sections (see the list on p. 167), the author shows the composer’s position between the old Tenorlied and a newer type of lied influenced by the madrigal and similar Italian genres. The author discovered that the secular lied “Mein Frau Hilgart” is based on the Marian song “Maria zart, von edler Art.”

                                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Just, Martin. “Liedtradition und Neuerung in Lassos fünfstimmigen Kompositionen mit deutschem Text.” In From Ciconia to Sweelinck: Donum natalicium Willem Elders. Edited by Albert Clement and Eric Jas, 269–305. Chloe. Beihefte zum Daphnis 21. Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi B. V., 1994.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Most of the lieder composed on a cantus prius factus have sacred texts. Elements of the preexisting melody are to be found in voices other than the tenor. Lassus seems less interested in the expression of text within this genre. Lieder without a cantus prius factus contain elements from genres like the chanson and the madrigal. Many musical examples as appendix.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Sandberger, Adolf. “Zu Lassos Kompositionen mit deutschem Text.” In Orlando di Lasso. Sämmtliche Werke. Vol. 18. Edited by Franz Xaver Haberl and Adolf Sandberger, 5–23. New York: Broude Brothers, 1973.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  First overview on Lassus’ German lieder, including their sources and texts. Also printed in Leuchtmann and Schmid 1968 (cited under Editions), Volume 18.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Schwindt, Nicole. “Der Körper als Thema—Lassos Nasenlied.” Trossinger Jahrbuch für Renaissancemusik 1 (2001): 133–156.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    An excellent case study on the text and the composition. Schwindt discusses the origins and the background of the text and offers a reasoned interpretation. The second part analyzes the composition.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Instrumental Music

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    No actual instrumental music composed by Lassus exists, but many intabulations are evident. Moreover, as is evident from many title pages, vocal compositions can be performed on instruments. (On these questions, see also Performance Practice and Adaptions for Instruments.) But twelve of the twenty-four bicinia (first published in 1577) do not have texts, and one follows compositional principles different from those found in texted works. Italian prints call these pieces “ricercari.” Leuchtmann 1995 analyzes Lassus’ Bicinium No. 23.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Leuchtmann, Horst. “Neues in Altem: Lasso als Initiator einer Instrumentalmusik.” In Altes im Neuen: Festschrift Theodor Göllner zum 65. Geburtstag. Edited by Bernd Edelmann and Manfred Hermann Schmid, 131–141. Tutzing, Germany: Hans Schneider, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Discusses the style of Bicinium No. 23, which is incapable of being fitted with a text, since it is laid out motivically. It thus opens up the possibility of purely instrumental music developing its own forms independent of vocal composition. A table with musical examples shows the motific variants.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Reception

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Lassus had considerable influence on composers of his time and in the 17th century. Some of his pupils (boys in his Hofkapelle) became famous composers (e.g., Giovanni Gabrieli, Leonhard Lechner, Johannes Eccard). His works also were widely disseminated, well known in the 17th century, and cited in many theoretical works as late as Giuseppe Paolucci’s Arte practica di contrappunto (Venezia: Antonio di Castro, 1765). On the other hand, he was influenced by older composers, such as Cipriano de Rore and Adrian Willaert. So Lassus’ work includes references to motets by Josquin and Willaert (Coeurdevey 2007) while he also influenced contemporary and later composers, such as Le Jeune (His 1995) and Turnhout (Haar 1999). Castro used Motets by Lassus as a model (Bossuyt 1999), and there are also parody masses on his motets and other composition (Göllner 1996). O’Regan 1999 gives evidence for cross-influences when Lassus visited Rome. McCredie 1996 discusses the influence of Lassus and his Munich circle on Stuttgart. Schmid 2007 shows Lassus as a composer ignoring the boundaries of genres, which is a precondition for the different genres with German texts. Meier 1982 gives an overview on Lassus cited in music theory.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Bossuyt, Ignace. “Orlando di Lasso as a Model for Composition as Seen in the Three-Voice Motets of Jean de Castro.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 158–182. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Describes de Castro’s techniques in adapting Lassus’ motets to three-part settings. Adds some madrigal elements to the models borrowed from Lassus. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Coeurdevey, Annie. “Josquin, Willaert, Lasso—Ein Dreiecksverhältnis?” Trossinger Jahrbuch für Renaissancemusik 7 (2007): 155–181.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          The author shows references in some Lassus motets to the same texts set by Josquin and Willaert.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Göllner, Marie Louise. “Lassos Motetten nach Hymnentexten und ihre Parodiemessen von Ivo de Vento und Andrea Gabrieli.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 87–100. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Lassus’ music was the base for many parody/imitation masses. Göllner discusses different compositional techniques: Gabrieli’s Mass, based on Lassus’ Vexilla regis prodeunt, was composed in a more conservative manner and preserves lots of the original material. In his Mass based on Lassus’ Iesu nostra redemptio, Vento includes some brilliant motives and passages, using them in a free manner. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Haar, James. “The Madrigal Book of Jean Turnhout (1589) and its Relationship to Lasso.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 183–202. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Ten madrigals in Turnhout’s Libro primo a six (Antwerp, Belgium 1589) are based on texts earlier set by Lassus. Moreover, the music shows Lassus’ influence. An appendix lists the content of Turnhout’s print, gives text incipits, and provides remarks on the pieces.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              • His, Isabelle. “Lassus, comme référence ou de la difficulté d’être un contemporain de Lassus.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 327–345. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Le Jeune’s work shows a discreet and complex relationship to Lassus. But only three works show direct connections: O occhi manza mia, Une puce j’ay dedans l’oreille, and Standomi un giorno/Un jour estant seulet.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                • McCredie, Andrew. “Orlando di Lasso’s Munich Circle and the Württembergische Hofkapelle at Stuttgart.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 175–190. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Between 1572 and 1606 a relationship existed between Lassus’ circle at Munich and the Württemberg Hofkapelle at Stuttgart, although Munich was Catholic and Stuttgart Protestant. In Stuttgart Lassus’ music was performed, and three Kapellmeisters at Stuttgart came from Munich (Ludwig Daser, Balduin Hoyoul, and Leonhard Lechner). Thus, these composers had to adapt themselves and their music to the newly established theological patterns.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Meier, Bernhard. “Orlandus Lassus im Urteil der Mit- und Nachwelt.” In Orlandus Lassus 1532–1594. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, 61–66. Leuven, Belgium: Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, K. U. Leuven, 1982.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Short overview of Lassus as evidence of musical composition in the music theory of the late 16th and 17th century.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • O’Regan, Noel. “Orlando di Lasso and Rome: Personal Contacts and Musical Influences.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 132–157. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      A survey of Lassus’ personal contacts in Rome between 1552 and 1554, when he lived there, and in 1574, when he visited Rome again. An inventory of his (and also Palestrina’s) contacts to the Archconfraternity of SS Crocefisso is included. Discusses musical cross-influences between Lassus and Roman colleagues. Musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Schmid, Bernhold. “‘Italian-Madrigalische Manier . . .’: Lasso und die Voraussetzungen der deutschen Vokalgattungen ab dem späten 16. Jahrhundert.” In Niederländisches und deutsches Lied zwischen 1480 und 1640: XXXIII. Wissenschaftliche Arbeitstagung Michaelstein, 6. bis 8. Mai 2005. Edited by Boje E. Hans Schmuhl and Ute Omonsky, 159–181. Michaelsteiner Konferenzberichte 72. Augsburg, Germany: Wißner-Verlag, 2007.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Lassus was disposed to blure the boundaries of genres by ignoring the musical style of genres (for example, there are madrigal style elements in German lieder as well as in motets). On the other hand, contrafacta of Lassus’ works often involved a change of language. Both can be seen as preconditions for giving up the bond of a specific language as a genre-determining characteristic. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Modality

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        There are numerous ways to describe the modality of music in the 16th century. Meier 1974 uses the music theory of the 16th and 17th centuries to do so. Following Hermelink’s Tonartentypen (see Hermelink 1960), Powers 1981 points to tonal types. These are reference works concerning the modality in the 16th century, while the other articles cited here deal exclusively with Lassus’ treatment of the modes. Reichert 1953 gives evidence that Lassus didn’t follow Glarean’s system. Crook 1997 is an overview of Lassus’ tonal compass in his motets. Bergquist 1999 shows modal organization in publications. Bergquist 1996 and Powers 1996 deal with exceptions.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Bergquist, Peter. “The Modality of Orlando di Lasso’s Compositions in ‘A Minor.’” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 7–18. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          The author examines a group of compositions by Lasso that seems to stand outside the system of eight modes to which he normally adhered (see Reichert 1953). The discussion of some pieces is based on extensive musical examples. Two tables give an overview on the pieces in question.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Bergquist, Peter. “Modal Ordering within Orlando di Lasso’s Publications.” In Orlando di Lasso Studies. Edited by Peter Bergquist, 203–226. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511551383.011Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Many publications of motets and compositions based on vernacular texts are organized according to the eight modes. French and German publications printed by publishers with whom Lassus had direct contacts are organized in this way, and they may reflect the composer’s own intentions. Only Italian publishers did not follow this principle.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Crook, David. “Tonal Compass in the Motets of Orlando di Lasso.” In Hearing the Motet: Essays on the Motet of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Edited by Dolores Pesce, 286–306. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Lassus restricted the tonal compass of his motets severely and consistently.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Hermelink, Siegfried. Dispositiones Modorum: Die Tonarten der Musik Palestrinas und seiner Zeitgenossen. Tutzing, West Germany: Hans Schneider, 1960.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                With regard to the problems arising from the use of ecclesiastical modes for polyphonic music, the author proposes a system of Tonartentypen that considers, for example, the clefs. The book is based on Palestrina’s music, but Hermelink gives many examples from Lassus. Many musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Meier, Bernhard. Die Tonarten der klassischen Vokalpolyphonie: Nach den Quellen dargestellt. Utrecht, The Netherlands: Oosthoek, Scheltema & Hokema, 1974.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Describes the ecclesiastical modes, following contemporary music theory. Many musical examples. Important for Lassus, because the author quotes Lassus’ pieces (and those of other composers as well) mentioned as examples in theoretical texts.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Powers, Harold S. “Tonal Types and Modal Categories in Renaissance Polyphony.” Journal of the American Musicological Society 34 (1981): 428–470.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    DOI: 10.2307/831189Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Following Siegfried Hermelink’s Tonartentypen, the author uses the notion of tonal types (not to be confused with the ecclesiastical modes), and analyzes some collections of motets, madrigals, and chansons organized after his modal criteria.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Powers, Harold. “Anomalous Modalities.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 221–242. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      A survey of some sources and cycles following the modes, and showing anomalies in them. Compares Lassus with Palestrina. Includes references to Bergquist 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Reichert, Georg. “Martin Crusius und die Musik in Tübingen um 1590.” Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 10 (1953): 185–212.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        DOI: 10.2307/929736Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Includes in an appendix (pp. 210–212) a letter from Lassus’ pupil Leonhard Lechner to Samuel Mageirus, which gives evidence that Lassus was not interested in Glarean’s system of twelve modes (see also p. 206).

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Lassus and the Theatre

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Lassus was involved in commedia dell’arte as director, composer, and performer (see Farahat 1990 and Katritzky 1996). He also composed choruses for some Jesuit plays (see Körndle 2000 and Körndle 2006). A comprehensive overview is given in Weller 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Farahat, Martha. “Villanescas of the Virtuosi: Lasso and the Commedia dell’arte.” Performance Practice Review 3.2 (1990): 121–137.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          DOI: 10.5642/perfpr.199003.02.3Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Massimo Troiano’s report on the wedding of Wilhelm V and Renata of Lorraine in 1568 (see Troiano 1980, cited under Performance Practice and Adaptions for Instruments) mentions musical pieces performed between acts in commedia dell’arte plays. The author assumes that Troiano did not mention all the music; in the commedia (also in the 1568 performances) one could have used pieces printed in the 1581 Libro de villanelle (Paris: Le Roy & Ballard).

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Katritzky, M. A. “Orlando di Lasso and the Commedia dell’arte.” In Orlando di Lasso in der Musikgeschichte, Bericht über das Symposium der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, München, 4–6 Juli 1994. Edited by Bernhold Schmid, 133–155. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Kommission bei der C. H. Beck’schen Verlagsbuchh., 1996.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            An overview on the subject: the commedia dell’arte was well known in Bavaria, as can be seen in the “Narrentreppe” in Trausnitz Castle in Landshut, where Wilhelm V resided before he became Bavarian duke. Massimo Troianos report on the wedding celebrities of 1568 (see Troiano 1980, cited under Performance Practice and Adaptions for Instruments) gives evidence that Lassus himself was engaged in commedia dell’arte. Lots of illustrations.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Körndle, Franz. “‘Ad te perenne gaudium’: Lassos Musik zum ‘Vltimum Judicium.’” Die Musikforschung 53.1 (2000): 68–70.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Identifies a group of texts composed by Lassus as choirs from Stefano Tucci’s play Christus Iudex.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Körndle, Franz. “Between Stage and Divine Service: Jesuits and Theatrical Music.”In The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences, and the Arts, 1540–1773. Edited by John W. O’Malley, Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Steven J. Harris, and T. Frank Kennedy. 479–497. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Music (often pieces by Lassus) played an integral part in many Jesuit dramas. Sometimes preexisting pieces were performed within plays, sometimes choruses had to be composed for plays. The author discusses the role of music in plays as viewed by the Jesuits, and gives archival material.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Weller, Philip. “Lasso, Man of the Theatre.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 89–127. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Discusses Lassus as influenced by Italian comic theatre as well as his contributions on Jesuit plays.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Performance Practice and Adaptions for Instruments

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  An overview on performance practice in the music of the Renaissance is presented in Welker 1992, which mentions Lassus in more than one respect. Some publications are dedicated to questions of intabulation and instrumental performance. An important source is Troiano 1980 (ed. Leuchtmann). Eppelsheim 1982 is a survey on the instruments in Lassus’ time. Ballman 1995 and Vaccaro 1985–1986 deal with lute intabulations and lutists. Moens 1995 gives an overview on violinists in Munich. Schreurs 1995 describes the musical life in Antwerp while Lassus was living there. Schwindt 1996 discusses Mielich’s painting of the Munich Hofkapelle in Mus. ms. A.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Ballman, Christine. “La musique profane de Roland de Lassus mise en tablature de luth.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time: Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 181–199. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    A survey of lute intabulations based on works by Lassus. Main publishers: Phalèse, Jobin, and Scotto. Almost eighty different Lassus pieces were intabulated between 1563 and 1612, especially around 1570. His secular music appeared three times more often than the motets, and his chansons are more common in tablature than madrigals.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Eppelsheim, Jürgen. “Musikinstrumente zur Zeit Orlando di Lassos.” Musik in Bayern 24 (1982): 11–42.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      A well-documented overview concerning instruments and probable combinations of instruments.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Moens, Karel. “Geiger in der Münchner Hofkapelle zur Zeit Lassos, und ihre Bedeutung für die Frühgeschichte der Violine.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time, Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 383–413. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Violinists were engaged in the Munich Hofkapelle, some of whom came from Bergamo (the Morari and Cerbonio families). The evolution of the violin at the Munich Hofkapelle is an example of the rising importance of the instrument.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Schreurs, Eugeen. “Musical Life and Performance Practices in Antwerp during Lassus’ Stay, 1554–1556.” In Orlandus Lassus and His Time, Colloquium Proceedings Antwerpen 24–26.08.1994. Edited by Ignace Bossuyt, Eugeen Schreurs, and Annelies Wouters, 363–381. Yearbook of the Alamire Foundation 1. Peer, Belgium: Alamire Foundation, 1995.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Discusses activities of musicians associated with the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk, the most important place for the religious, musical, and cultural life of Antwerp. Musical activities in other Antwerp churches, as well as secular music, are also discussed.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Schwindt, Nicole. “Hans Mielichs bildliche Darstellung der Münchner Hofkapelle von 1570.” Acta Musicologica 68 (1996): 48–85.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            DOI: 10.2307/932680Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Mus. ms. A in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München contains a famous illustration with the Munich Hofkapelle in Lassus’ time, painted by Hans Mielich. Schwindt demonstrates that this painting is not a realistic picture of an ensemble in the late Renaissance, but rather the official structure of a Hofkapelle. Schwindt uses Troiano 1980 to show the possibilities for ensembles in the late 16th century.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Troiano, Massimo. Die Münchner Fürstenhochzeit von 1568. Massimo Troiano: Dialoge. Edited by Horst Leuchtmann. Munich and Salzburg, Austria: Emil Katzbichler, 1980.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Troiano’s Dialoghi: Ne’ quali si narrano le cose più notabile fatte nelle Nozze dello . . . Prencipe gvglielmo VI is a description of the Munich wedding celebrations of 1568 (Wilhelm, duke Albrecht’s son, was married to Renata from Lothringen) is an important source for performance practice in the Munich Hofkapelle in Lassus’ time.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Vaccaro, Jean-Michel. “Roland de Lassus, les luthistes français et la chanson.” Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenschap 39–40 (1985–1986): 158–174.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                DOI: 10.2307/3686975Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Discusses the techniques of ornamental elaboration used by French lutenists in adapting Lassus’ chansons on the lute. Musical examples.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Welker, Lorenz. “Kapitel II: Die Musik der Renaissance.” In Neues Handbuch der Musikwissenschaft. Vol. 11, Musikalische Interpretation. Edited by Hermann Danuser, 139–215. Laaber, Germany: Laaber-Verlag, 1992.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Save Citation »Export Citation »E-mail Citation »

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  A fundamental overview of performance practice of the 15th and 16th centuries, with a comprehensive bibliography covering up until about 1991. Organized in chapters on ensembles, problems of tuning and temperament, music and text, and improvisation and diminution.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Find this resource:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  back to top

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Article

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Up

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Down